Okay so I know that this has probably been asked a buzzilion times and is probably a really stupid question, but what is the difference between HDPE and Polypro hoops? Whats good and bad abou t each?

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PPE is lighter and a little more flexible. It's also a little clearer tubing.

When we make PPE LED hoops you can see the wiring inside, which I think is kinda cool.
So is PPE the same as polypro?
just saw this...but I think rich cleared everything up for ya;)
HDPE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-density_polyethylene

Polypro: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polypropylene

Polypropylene is a harder, denser plastic (polymer). HDPE is made from petroleum.

Which is better or preferred? Depends on what you want to hoop with. Do you want something lighter but a harder and thinner? Go for the polypro. If you live in cold climate be careful because it can crack, even shatter if brought in from extreme cold to warm. Let it get to room temp. before you hoop with it.

On the other hand the HDPE can get a little "mushy" if you live in an extremely warm climate and it's out in the sun.
and just what is pex?
White plastics were very recently introduced to our community so this isn't a stupid question at all.

Polyproplyne is the standard. High Density Polypropylene is a recent addition as well as Polypropylene. (I'll add that Psihoops has been making hoops out of these plastics for years but the desire for faster lighter didn't exist until recently so these plastics weren't being used for non-led hoop.)

More info here:
http://isopop.com/2010/02/22/how-to-make-high-performance-white-pla...

Polyethylene = PE
High Density Polyethylene = HDPE
Polypropylene = PPE = PolyPro

Each of these plastics are very useable for hoops and each caters to a different style of hooper. In my eye it's like titanium bike frames vs. aluminum bike frames.

Polyethylene (PE) is what almost everyone starts with. It's a great go-to plastic and great for your regular hoop. Most (I think) advanced hoopers still stick to this plastic. By no means is this an inferior hoop. It is a bit more flexible than some of the recent discoveries but it is still great for almost everyone.

High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) is the same chemical makeup as PE. It's white rather than black. It's a bit lighter and a bit stiffer. If you're kinking your PE hoop because you're reversing very fast, or if your regular PE is feeling too heavy, HDPE is a good idea to try. The stiffness is comparable generally.

Polypro (PPE) is lighter, springier, spongier, and harder to kink. For someone who is searching for more responsiveness and faster reverses, this is potentially the direction to go. Since it is so light, if your body hasn't attained the muscle memory from years of experience with heavier hoops, this plastic can almost feel like it doesn't exist. It doesn't pull on you the way other hoops do... i recommend hooping for a long time with a PE hoop prior to moving to PPE in order to attain the muscle memory required to anticipate the hoops movement. A PPE hoop won't teach you it's anticipatory path.

As far as temp goes... don't worry about temperature. The normal range of temperatures than humans live in won't really affect these hoops. I recommend never leaving your hoop in the sun, but a cold day won't crack your hoop ( at least not often enough to consider it as a hoop design constraint.)

Hope this helps,
xoR
Thanks!! :D

Polyethlene is the standared tubing used then to make hoops?

 

Wow, this is old information, before I did a study on all this.  No, there is not a "standard" tubing for hoops.  Because most home hoop makers were using PSI (pounds per square inch) as the measurement of value between the various tubes, most of them never knew if they were using PVC, PPE, LDPE PEX, or whatever.

 

All the polyethylenes, polypropylenes and pvcs have the same weight per similar volume.  HDPE is the stiffest of the polyethylenes and the most heat resistant.  PEX and PVC have wildly different colors, densities, PSI, etc.  PPE is the new star in the hoop world because it's stiffer at smaller sizes.  So you can get a thin walled, small diameter hoop that feels as stiff and springy as a much heavier one.  the result is faster tricks.  The down sides are reports of shattering, and lower heat resistance.

wow this was great info thanks!

PEX is a crosslinked HDPE for more strength.
So I was checking out the McMaster/Carr website Rich suggests on isopop, and I noticed they had several warehouses in major cities. I live right outside of Atlanta, and I e-mailed their location asking if I could pick up Polypro tubing from the Atlanta warehouse to avoid shipping costs. I got the following reply:

"Pricing is listed below. You may pick up the tubing at our Atlanta facility after you place your order. Will call is open from 9-1 on Saturday.

Alison
>>>
3/4? O.D. PPE (McMaster Car# 5392K17) $1.16/ft
and 3/4? O.D. PPE (McMaster Car #5392K41) Material is discontinued. Replacement is part 5392K16 which is $0.98/ft and in stock. The only difference is the 5392K16 is rated to 200 degrees F (not 220 degrees F)."

Yayyy now this adventure will be wayyyy cheaper! I suggest anyone in major cities to contact their warehouses!

I think they have locations in Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, New Jersey, and LA.

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